Outdoor Play

Physical activity is important for children’s health. Planning for outdoor play better enables the children to concentrate on their schoolwork.  We often say, “We give the children 15 minutes of outside play and they in-turn give us another hour of hard work.”

       Outside activity also impacts children’s social/emotional development. Children invent games when outside.  They become directors and organizers. They experience autonomy and grow a head taller in their play. (Lev Vygotsky) Rules are invented, which promote an understanding of why rules are necessary.  Conflicts arise and conflicts are resolved.

       Observing the children play outside brings smiles to our faces. Their imaginations are in high gear as they dig for treasure, collect gifts from nature and make fairy houses.  Often their play reenacts our Theme studies. Twigs and acorns become Lenape villages and  “three sister’s stew,” and hunting for gold always surfaces during our rock study. Our observations enable us to build a more comprehensive understanding of the whole child.